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Posts Tagged ‘photographer’

Tell us a bit about yourself….

My name’s Breonny, (or just Bre if that’s too daunting to pronounce.) In a nutshell, I am a 29-year-old photographer and life-enthusiast, currently residing in Dallas with three rambunctious children and one exuberant mutt.

As you have grown within your talent, what inspires you to create?

I am continually inspired by the beauty of the world around us and the people who move in and out of our lives. It is the awe of the dawn and the power of rushing water. It is the way a musician makes love to his instrument or the tingle of new romance. It is the empty yearning of loss. These are the things I see, that beckon me to capture them, preserve them, enhance them, and release them on the world. I create because I need to, because I know no other way.

How long have you been producing your craft and why did you begin this form of expression?

I’ve been shooting for a little over 12 years. I spent my childhood experimenting with numerous forms of creative expression including writing, and various visual and performing arts. When I discovered photography at 17, it felt so natural and intuitive I soon abandoned all other interests in fervent pursuit of this one, all-encompassing desire. After spending years working exclusively in commercial ventures, I set out 2 1/2 years ago to explore the world anew–to refind the passion for art that lured me behind the camera in the first place. My work has taken a whole new adventurous direction. I see things in ways I never have before. I also devote a tremendous amount of time to manipulating my images into unusual methods of presentation, effectively blurring the lines between photography and painting.

What do you ultimately want to accomplish with your talent?

Simply, to place my work in front of an audience and convey the value of true beauty, and the one, fragile life we have to experience it.

Outside of your artistry, what other interests do you have?

Lately, I find my time outside of photography and art spent simply enjoying life with my children Riley, Rixie, and Bryndel, and riding and rebuilding motorcycles with my boyfriend, Brian.

What was your first experience with ArtLoveMagic?

My first experience with ArtLoveMagic was attending girlShow 2010. I was overwhelmed by the number of artists squished into one show together and the chaos of art flying at you from all directions. I’m thrilled to see my ArtLoveMagic experience come full circle and participate in girlShow for the first time this year!

What web address can one go to to view more of what you do?

http://www.breonny.com

How can someone contact you?

I can be reached via e-mail @ breonny@breonny.com, or phone @ 817.999.5201.

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Dorothea Lange

“While there is perhaps a province in which the photograph can tell us nothing more than what we see with our own eyes, there is another in which it proves to us how little our eyes permit us to see.” —Dorothea Lange

Good art is said “to fact the unknown”.[1] Dorothea Lange’s art reaches above and beyond this thought and gives the unknown a striking and powerful voice. Born in 1895, New Jersey native and photographer Dorothea Lange developed her career across the United States: her work with famed photographers Arnold Genthe and Ansel Adams fueled as inspirations to co-found Apeture in 1952, the high-standard quarterly photography magazine out of New York, while polio, at the age of seven, sculpted her physically and mentally, leaving her with a permanent limp and a deep awareness. [2] As a photographer, Lange is famous for every face but her own, especially the face of Florence Owens Thompson, the subject of the 1936 photograph, “Migrant Mother”. At the time Dorothea took this photo her work was centered on the farmers and migrants whose lives were disrupted by the Dust Bowl. Lange’s photographs not only captured the faces and famine of the Great Depression, but shouted for the hollow and hungry voices of her subjects. Her vivid images brought life to the dead plains, persuasive evidence of the urgent need for government programs to assist disadvantaged Americans. [3]

“Migrant Mother”

Like the dust that swept across the United States during the Great Depression, shock swept over Lange’s onlookers as she developed photos ranging from young Japanese immigrants, pledging allegiance to American flags before being piled into internment camps on the Western U.S. coast, to the founding of the United Nations in San Francisco. As a female photographer, Dorothea dismissed the borders of the camera lens and the almost non-existent voice women had in the media as she managed to symbolize the political struggles of immigrants, expose the exhaustion of famine and provide a plea for help for those too thirsty to even speak, in mere frames.

As we rewind and look back at Dorothea for inspiration, it becomes clear that Lange is part of a group of women who developed their careers by focusing forward towards the future voices of their fellow female artists.

— Chelsea Miller

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Tell me a little bit about yourself…

My name is Heather Alley.  I work as a photographer and I am also a painter.  I work mostly in watercolor or oil, with my most current body of work being a watercolor series titled “Sideshow Whimsy.”  I work from my personal photographs in most of my paintings.

 

As you have grown within your talent, what inspires you to create?

Seeing my progress and looking back at my work.  I love anything visual with a vintage, artsy kind of  feel to it.  I often listen to music while I’m working and that’s something I really enjoy.  I’m big on soundtrack scores, which usually have more emotional and visual tones to them.

 

How long have you been producing your craft and why did you begin this form of expression?

Started in 2006 with modeling which led to me to get involved on the other side of the camera as a photographer and to go to art school. I primarily work with photography and painting currently but will venture in other areas as well.

I realized after spending 3 years in school for a health degree and not going so well with it that I should maybe look at something else. A good friend I modeled for suggested art after seeing my sketch books and what I enjoyed (my collection of art books and Cirque Du Soleil books). Went through a learning curve a bit to figure out what I wanted to actually do with it and also realizing it was something I could be successful with and be happy long term – but have been thoroughly happy since.

 

What do you ultimately want to accomplish with your talent?

Would like to have my own studio in a renovated Victorian home.   In regards to my painting I would like my work to be readily recognized.  Would like to consider myself a modern day “Toulouse Lautrec” with my watercolor body of work “Sideshow Whimsy.”

 

As one of Dallas’ amazing artists, what advice would you offer to the next generation of creative females?

Stay true to what you enjoy as a artist… even though that might take awhile for you to realize what that actually is.

 

Do you have a specific childhood memory that has inspired your life as an artist?

I’ve always been drawn to art… Didn’t seriously start developing my skills until my 20’s.  Most things growing up were indirect influences, not specific.

What web address can one go to to view more of what you do and contact you?

http://www.HeatherAlley.com
heather@heatheralley.com


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Tell me a little bit about yourself…

My full name is Yesenia Soto. I always felt cheated out of a middle name. Which is where the idea of an alias came from.  I am a full time freelance photographer and obsessed with the idea of working with agencies, high profile models and magazines.

As you have grown within your talent, what inspires you to create?

Music is the greatest inspiration. Sometimes I am so overwhelmed with a feeling that it creates images in my head, creating tones scenes with each note. As theatrical as it sounds is exactly as extravagant as it is in my head.

Ultimately, thinking of my audiences is what helps me to continue to create. Knowing that a single thought and action can spark a sudden combustion of feeling in a person is incredible. Multiplying it by possible millions is the feeling I strive for.

How long have you been producing your craft and why did you begin this form of expression?

I have caressed a camera since 2008.

It has been a snowball effect ever since my first client in senior year of highschool.
My very first model being myself.. I loved manipulating photos and surprising my friends with cool new looks that seemed to be ever-changing and surprisingly ever-progressing.
It was impossible to discontinue something that had a life of its own.
This life quickly consumed me.

What do you ultimately want to accomplish with your talent?

At my last breath, I would like to know that the people viewing my works understand the love that I have for beauty and the art of natural talent.
I want to create photographs with people that become genuine and are revisited through out the years.
Above all, I would like to use photography as my vehicle to fuse Earth’s potential with the human body.

As one of Dallas’ amazing artists, what advice would you offer to the next generation of creative females?

Fear & Anger is almost as powerful as passion. Manifest it.

Do you have a specific childhood memory that has inspired your life as an artist?

I can’t help but equate the emotions I have now when I create to the emotions of creating with a self timer and presenting them to my friends.

Seems to be the same, just on a growing scale.

What web address can one go to to view more of what you do and contact you?

http://www.sukilynn.com

http://www.facebook.com/yesi.soto


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